Speakers

Conor Walsh

Harvard University
John A. Paulson Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

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Matteo Bianchi

University of Pisa
Research Center E. Piaggio

Wearable haptics and human sensory-motor system modelling for advancing pHRI and human-machine interaction


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Jessica Allen

West Virginia University
Research Center E. Piaggio

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Gregory Sawicki

Georgia Institute of Technology
Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Dept. of Biological Sciences

Using physiological states to control lower-limb exoskeletons


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Bastien Berret

University Paris-Saclay

Movement vigor during human-exoskeleton interaction and the value of time

In daily life we usually move at a self-selected speed referred to as movement vigor. Understanding the underpinnings of movement invigoration has attracted a lot of attention in neuroscience. In the last decade, a cost of time theory stating that our brain is fundamentally sensitive to the passage of time during the control of goal-directed actions has emerged. Such a cognitive cost of time may have strong implications on the effectiveness and acceptability of assisting devices such as exoskeletons. These devices are often designed to decrease the user’s muscular effort but rarely consider the vigor they lead to and, therefore, tend to disregard the value of time in action control. In this talk, I will discuss the link between movement vigor and the cost of time within the framework of optimal control and illustrate the value of time in tasks where an energy-efficient but too slow assistance is provided to the user.

Bastien Berret obtained his PhD in applied mathematics and computational neuroscience in 2008 from the Université de Bourgogne (Dijon, France). In 2009, he joined the Italian Institute of Technology (Genoa, Italy) as a post-doctoral researcher in the Robotics, Brain and Cognitive Sciences department. In 2012, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor at the Université Paris-Saclay (Orsay, France). In 2017, he became a junior member of the Institut Universitaire de France (IUF). He is now a full professor in Human Movement Sciences at the Université of Paris-Saclay. His main research aims to better understand human motor control through modeling and experimentation, and to exploit this knowledge to improve control laws in applications involving robotic exoskeletons.

Massimo Sartori

University of Twente
Dept. of Neuromechanical Engineering

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Ashish Deshpande

University of Texas Austin
Walker Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

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